Recent News

Airman 1st Class Caroline Karaverdian, 9th Medical Group outpatient technician, files a folder in the patient health record department at the clinic at Beale Air Force Base, California, Feb. 4, 2020. On June 20 the 9th MDG will be going all-digital by transitioning to a new electronic health record called Military Health System GENESIS. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Valentina Viglianco)
Department of Defense Military Health System GENESIS logo (Courtesy Graphic)
Senior Airman Jennifer Carrier, assigned to the 319th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Detachment 1 as the unit deployment manager, stands in front of a Globalhawk on Beale Air Force Base, Calif., Jan. 31, 2020. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Jason W. Cochran)
Airman 1st Class Joshua Chatman, 9th Operations Support Squadron aircrew flight equipment specialist, places a strain relief cord back into an oxygen mask hose after cleaning it out, Jan. 22, 2020 at Beale Air Force Base, California. To ensure oxygen masks are properly functioning, aircrew flight equipment specialists inspect them every 30 days. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)
Airman 1st Class Maggie Breedlove, 9th Operations Support aircrew flight equipment specialist, measures and cuts Velcro pieces that will be placed in the inside of a flyers lightweight helmet, Jan. 22, 2020 at Beale Air Force Base, California. These pieces of Velcro will attach an energy absorbing liner to the helmet. The purpose of an energy absorbing liner is to reduce impact energy to the head of a pilot. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)
Wrenches lie in an aircraft mechanic’s toolbox at Beale Air Force Base, California, Jan. 27, 2020. Mechanics are vital to ensuring the readiness of the 9th Reconnaissance Wing’s intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance flying operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Valentina Viglianco)
Wesley Dietrich, 9th Maintenance Operation Squadron aircraft mechanic, runs an air speed test on a T-38 Talon at Beale Air Force Base, California, Jan. 27, 2020. A group of civilian contractors prepare T-38s for their daily flying schedules by refueling and inspecting the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Valentina Viglianco)
Wesley Dietrich, 9th Maintenance Operation Squadron aircraft mechanic, looks into a T-38 Talon cockpit during an air speed test at Beale Air Force Base, California, Jan. 27, 2020. This test measures the aircraft’s speed with a static tube system, which can determine the speed of the air flowing around the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Valentina Viglianco)
Wesley Dietrich, 9th Maintenance Operation Squadron aircraft mechanic, clicks a switch on a pressure-temperature test device at Beale Air Force Base, California, Jan. 27, 2020. The T-38s are part of the Companion Trainer Program for U-2 Dragon Lady pilots. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Valentina Viglianco)
Wesley Dietrich, 9th Maintenance Operation Squadron aircraft mechanic, looks into a T-38 Talon cockpit at Beale Air Force Base, California, Jan. 27, 2020. The T-38 is a twin-engine, high-altitude, supersonic jet trainer used in a variety of roles because of its ease of maintenance, elevated performance, and exceptional safety record. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Valentina Viglianco)

Chief's Corner

I am an American Airman

Too often I hear the statement, “The Air Force has no tradition…certainly not like the other services.” Or there’s the comment, “The Air Force changes everything all the time.  New uniforms, AFI’s, etc….how can we expect to maintain any heritage or tradition?”
I submit there is one decisive, deliberate, and motivating action each of us can take.  No matter the position you hold, the grade you wear, or if you are active duty, guard, reserve, retired, every single one of us can implement this small, yet powerful change today.  The change refers to a facet of our current culture.
Malcolm Gladwell speaks about culture change in his book, ‘Tipping Point’.  In his book, the author posits that even the smallest adjustments to habits, routines, or attitudes can have a significant impact on the culture or perception of an organization, population, or product.
Therefore, I challenge everyone to stop referring to members of our Air Force as ‘TROOPS’. 
According to Merriam-Webster, the primary definition of the word troop is:
a. A group of soldiers
b. A cavalry unit corresponding to an infantry company
c. A flock of mammals or birds
I understand a definition is literal, however, there are two problems with the way we throw this term around to refer to our Airmen.  First, the word troop is actually plural…referring to a group of soldiers.  Lastly, and most poignantly, the word troop is actually rooted in a tradition and heritage of another service.  And before we start the “But Chief, we were born out of the Army” conversation, I would ask you to consider a few points. 
We were born out of the Army for a reason.  We fulfill several needs that no other organization can: to keep up with advancing technology and to take warfighting to an entirely different level, both geographically and mentally.  The Army and Navy were long-time competitors for military leadership and neither service thought that the other should take on the new tasks of strategic deterrence missions associated with the advent of the atomic bomb.  This, along with many other great reasons, is why our Air Force, and our AIRMEN were created.
Think about it.  The United States Air Force was created for some of the most sophisticated warfare challenges of the time. 
So, let’s continue the tradition born in 1947 and call each other what we truly are.  Please, call me Airman.

Chief Hall

 

 

Phone Numbers

Public Affairs
  • 530-634-8887
Base Operator
  • 530-634-3000
Beale Straight Talk Line for emergency and alert information
  • 530-634-8889

ArticleCS

Beale ALS adapts as AF culture changes

Four Airmen Leadership School instructors pose for a photo

From left, Tech. Sgt. Joseph Kopp and Tech. Sgt. Allan Degala, 9th Force Support Squadron, Airman Leadership School instructors, Master Sgt. StaLissa K. Mendez, 9th FSS, ALS commandant, and Staff Sgt. Yariel Ramirez, 9th FSS, ALS instructor, stand together at the William H. Pitsenbarger Professional Military Education Center, Beale Air Force Base, California, Nov. 22, 2019. ALS instructors serve on a three to four-year special duty assignment preparing Senior Airmen for increased responsibilities as a NCO, supervisor and leader. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Airman 1st Class Melanie L. Nolen)

A photo of a senior non-commissioned officer addressing an Airmen Leadership School class.

Master Sgt. Malcolm Curtis, 319th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Detachment 1 pro Superintendent, addresses students at Airman Leadership School, in the William H. Pitsenbarger Professional Military Education Center, Beale Air Force Base, California, Nov. 21, 2019. Curtis taught techniques for public speaking to help the students be better prepared for their oral performance tasks and their future duties as U.S. Air Force NCOs. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Airman 1st Class Melanie L. Nolen)

A photo of Airmen sitting in desks during a Airmen Leadership School class

Airman Leadership School students check their assignments at the William H. Pitsenbarger Professional Military Education Center, on Beale Air Force Base, California, Nov. 22, 2019. ALS is the first-level PME course designed to prepare Senior Airmen to supervise and become leaders. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Airman 1st Class Melanie L. Nolen)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

With an instructor cadre of three NCOs and one senior NCO, the Airman Leadership School at Beale AFB may seem small, but they know how they are impacting future leaders of the Air Force.  With most of the Senior Airmen students from Beale and a few from surrounding bases, this cadre knows that helping the Air Force’s newest NCOs adapt to a changing culture will need to start with them.

“In the Air Force, the one constant is change, and being able to adapt to those changes is critical,” said Master Sgt. StaLissa K. Mendez, the commandant of Beale ALS.  “If we are not able to adapt and change with the times, we are going to be left behind.”

Over the past year, many student-focused changes have been happening at ALS. Three of those changes include revising the curriculum, updating and renaming the classrooms, and transferring the role of graduation guest speaker to ALS students.

“The major change for almost all students and staff was the removal of the graded examinations, but students are now tasked with graded performance tasks, simulations and a Capstone,” said Mendez. “Another change in curriculum was the deletion of drill and ceremonies, although we still conduct reveille and retreat daily. Some great additions are lessons such as the National Defense Strategy, Nuclear Enterprise and Critical Thinking. Those are all going on in today’s Air Force.”

In addition to new classroom lessons, the students will be learning from each other’s experiences.

“A lot of the material that we have now can be personalized to each individual person,” said Tech. Sgt. Joseph Kopp, an instructor at Beale ALS. “It relies a lot on the students to share their experiences in their own career and it’s less of a ‘here is the book and here is the test’. It’s more about ways to creatively solve a problem. We are trying to build that ability to think on your feet, think critically and make good choices and this curriculum is pushing that.”

 The curriculum changes began with the June 2019 ALS class and the validation period will go until February 2020, said Mendez. There may be additional changes adopted at that time.

“In addition to the curriculum changes, we began revitalizing the building by changing the names of the flight rooms and updating classroom technology for better delivery of the new curriculum,” said Mendez.

To be more relevant for students, the names of the student classrooms are now Global Hawk, Blackbird and Dragon Lady to reflect the reconnaissance aircraft with a history here at Beale, said Kopp.

Another way to make ALS more relevant to the students was to have current ALS students speak at graduation, in addition to having higher-ranking guest speakers.

“ALS is about Airmen leaving the Airman tier and being confident and prepared to step into the Sergeant tier,” said Mendez.  “I think it’s important that they are able to tell a story about what’s important to them and what they have learned coming up in rank."

It’s more impactful from the student’s perspective to hear one of their peers talk about how they need to be leaders, why it’s important to take care of the people coming behind them and how they play a role in the story of those who led before them, said Kopp.

Learning from past leaders is only part of the foundation that ALS graduates will need to excel in a leadership role.

“We are giving the Airmen some foundational learning and then giving them back to their units,” said Kopp. “We are relying on them, once they graduate, to continue their development from being a new NCO to becoming a stellar NCO. We ask the units, ‘If you have questions, ask us. Give us your feedback.’  A lot can be answered if we communicate.”

Communication has been and will always be a key part of the success of the students and PME as a whole, said Mendez.

“The schoolhouse cannot run on its own as it takes support from all,” Mendez said. “I am grateful to our Wing leadership, the first sergeants, the chiefs group and the student supervisors for their honest thoughts about how we are producing our next generation of leaders. Our instructor cadre have adapted to change rapidly and I know that we will continue to produce excellence out of the schoolhouse.”

 

Mid-Air Collision Avoidance

Photo Studio

Book an appointment with 9th Reconnaissance Wing Public Affairs using SetMore