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A fire engine is parked in the department loading bay at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 27, 2020. Engines are always parked facing out so when an emergency call happens they are ready to go. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)
Beale firefighters stand at parade rest for an official photo at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 27, 2020. The 9th Civil Engineering Squadron firefighters are credited with receiving the Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Ralph E. Sanborn, Fire Department of the Year Award for medium sized fire department across the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)
A wooden American flag is mounted on the wall surrounded by patches of various fire departments that Beale firefighters have worked with, at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 27, 2020. Beale firefighters train and assist local fire departments in times of local crisis or during upgrade training. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)
Staff Sgt. Brandon Green, 99th Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chief, sprays disinfectant liquid on a rag to sanitize a U-2 Dragon Lady’s cockpit Mar. 23, 2020 at Beale Air Force Base, California. The cockpits on Beale’s fleet of U-2s will be sanitized on a regular basis to prevent the spread of COVID-19. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)
Staff Sgt. Brandon Green, 99th Aircraft Maintenance Unit dedicated crew chief, disinfects the side of a U-2’s canopy Mar. 23, 2020 at Beale Air Force Base, California. To prevent the spread of COVID-19, Airmen are sanitizing the U-2 Dragon Lady’s cockpit regularly, ensuring the safety of U-2 pilots and Airmen working on the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)
The Commissary on Beale Air Force Base California, Mar. 23, 2020. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Jason W. Cochran)
Airman Leon Guico, Left, 9th Medical Group (MDG) health administrator, and Senior Airman Christopher Miracle, 9th MDG optometry technician, guard the Entry Control Point (ECP) at the Clinic on Beale Air Force Base, California, Mar. 12, 2020. The ECP was set up at the Beale Clinic to protect Airmen and their families from the growing COVID-19 threat. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)
Lynn Bergmann, 9th Medical Group (MDG) patient safety program coordinator, right, and Denise Ross, 9th MDG Patient Advocate, left, pose for a photo in front of the clinic’s marquee on Beale Air Force Base, California, March 11, 2020. National Patient Safety Week occurred from 8-14 March 2020.
Lynn Bergmann, 9th Medical Group (MDG) Patient Safety Program Coordinator, center, and Denise Ross, 9th MDG Patient Advocate, right, speak to an Airman about patient safety on Beale Air Force Base, California, March 11, 2020. Educating Beale personnel was one of several things Bergmann and Ross did to promote Patient Safety week.
A beaker of Liquid Oxygen (LOX) is stationed in a testing area at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 4, 2020. Airmen observe the beaker and the film of white paper inside to see and smell if the LOX has any discoloration, discrepancies or smell. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

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Chief's Corner

I am an American Airman

Too often I hear the statement, “The Air Force has no tradition…certainly not like the other services.” Or there’s the comment, “The Air Force changes everything all the time.  New uniforms, AFI’s, etc….how can we expect to maintain any heritage or tradition?”
I submit there is one decisive, deliberate, and motivating action each of us can take.  No matter the position you hold, the grade you wear, or if you are active duty, guard, reserve, retired, every single one of us can implement this small, yet powerful change today.  The change refers to a facet of our current culture.
Malcolm Gladwell speaks about culture change in his book, ‘Tipping Point’.  In his book, the author posits that even the smallest adjustments to habits, routines, or attitudes can have a significant impact on the culture or perception of an organization, population, or product.
Therefore, I challenge everyone to stop referring to members of our Air Force as ‘TROOPS’. 
According to Merriam-Webster, the primary definition of the word troop is:
a. A group of soldiers
b. A cavalry unit corresponding to an infantry company
c. A flock of mammals or birds
I understand a definition is literal, however, there are two problems with the way we throw this term around to refer to our Airmen.  First, the word troop is actually plural…referring to a group of soldiers.  Lastly, and most poignantly, the word troop is actually rooted in a tradition and heritage of another service.  And before we start the “But Chief, we were born out of the Army” conversation, I would ask you to consider a few points. 
We were born out of the Army for a reason.  We fulfill several needs that no other organization can: to keep up with advancing technology and to take warfighting to an entirely different level, both geographically and mentally.  The Army and Navy were long-time competitors for military leadership and neither service thought that the other should take on the new tasks of strategic deterrence missions associated with the advent of the atomic bomb.  This, along with many other great reasons, is why our Air Force, and our AIRMEN were created.
Think about it.  The United States Air Force was created for some of the most sophisticated warfare challenges of the time. 
So, let’s continue the tradition born in 1947 and call each other what we truly are.  Please, call me Airman.

Chief Hall

 

 

ArticleCS

Current Scout Honors Beale’s Past

Tech. Sgt. Noah Cheney, an explosive ordinance disposal team leader and Scout Master of Troop 36 in Marysville, poses for a picture with his son Braydon at the POW site on Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Nov 20, 2018.  Braydon organized a renovation of the site for his project that is required a required part of his promotion to Eagle Scout. (Air Force photo by Tech Sgt. Shawn Bryant)

Tech. Sgt. Noah Cheney, an explosive ordinance disposal team leader and Scout Master of Troop 36 in Marysville, poses for a picture with his son Braydon at the POW site on Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Nov 20, 2018. Braydon organized a renovation of the site for his project that is required a required part of his promotion to Eagle Scout. (Air Force photo by Tech Sgt. Shawn Bryant)

The POW site was full of weeds, the photos were non-existent, and the sign needed painting prior to the efforts of Braydon Cheney, a Boy Scout from Troop 36 in Marysville.  He led 27 volunteers during a two-month restoration project.  Air Force photo courtesy of Tech. Sgt. Noah Cheney.

The POW site was full of weeds, the photos were non-existent, and the sign needed painting prior to the efforts of Braydon Cheney, a Boy Scout from Troop 36 in Marysville. He led 27 volunteers during a two-month restoration project. Air Force photo courtesy of Tech. Sgt. Noah Cheney.

Braydon Cheney, a Boy Scout from Troop 36 in Marysville, worked with the 9th Civil Engineer Squadron to obtain rakes, paint, and rock in order to restore the POW site.  Completing this project brings him one step closer to becoming an Eagle Scout. (Air Force photo by Tech Sgt. Shawn Bryant)

Braydon Cheney, a Boy Scout from Troop 36 in Marysville, worked with the 9th Civil Engineer Squadron to obtain rakes, paint, and rock in order to restore the POW site. Completing this project brings him one step closer to becoming an Eagle Scout. (Air Force photo by Tech Sgt. Shawn Bryant)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif -- There will come a day when there aren’t any World War II Veterans still living among us.  When all of these mighty Americans have left us, only memories, history, and memorial sites will remain.

Approximately 16 million Americans served in the Armed Forces during World War II.  Currently, 2.4 million youths and one million volunteers are participating in the Boy Scouts of America.  It is safe to say, there are a fair amount of parallels between these organizations. 

Aside from the obvious similarities, like uniforms, rank, and comradery, the Armed Forces, regardless of branch, values leadership. 

According to their site, “The Boy Scouts of America provides the nation’s foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training, which helps young people be “Prepared. For Life.”

One such future leader, Braydon Cheney, a Boy Scout from Troop 36 in Marysville, took it upon himself to pay homage to those Americans who protected our nation as he completed his eagle project in hopes of progressing to the rank of Eagle Scout. 

“We were looking at all of the projects we could do and when we saw the German POW site, we saw how it was all run down and we needed to restore it,” Braydon said.  “With all of the prep and planning it took about two months."

During this time, his father, Tech. Sgt. Noah Cheney, an explosive ordinance disposal team leader and Scout Master of Troop 36 in Marysville, sponsored the project. 

“Boys must complete an eagle project, among other things, in order to become an Eagle Scout,” Cheney said.  “The Scouts themselves are in charge of it and it’s a leadership growth experience for them.”

Both the Armed Forces and the Boy Scouts both place members in uncomfortable situations at times that require them to grow as individuals.  While Braydon did have the support of his father, the bulk of the project rested entirely on his shoulders.

“I was the lead on this project and it was cool to see about 27 volunteers helping out,” Braydon said.  “It was difficult in situations and some parts were stressful, but I think the Boy Scouts of America is a very good system to use because you are able to get more leadership and get more prepared for the world.”

This leadership experience is one of the key components of the Boy Scout ethos and is designed to challenge participants to be prepared for whatever may come next, which is a very similar tactic used by the military as well.  The team of boys pulled weeds, refurbished the signage, and laid new rock to revamp the area. 

“The Eagle Project is really neat to be a part of because it’s really big growth for the boys,” Cheney said.  “You can see the leadership as they have to do all the planning deciding what they are going to do, where they will get donations, and how to obtain supplies.”

The 9th Civil Engineer Squadron approved the endeavor as a base beautification project and were therefore able to provide rakes, paint, and rock to support the Scouts’ efforts.  A parent’s job is not all that dissimilar to that of a military supervisor, in that, both do their very best to prepare those in their charge to be successful in life.

“The reason I wanted my son to be in the Boys Scouts is because it’s kind of like the Air Force, you know we have our core values and the Scouts have the Scout law and the Scout Oath, so that’s a good foundation,” Cheney said.  “It’s a fun program that helps them be ready for the world.”

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