Recent News

Airman 1st Class Caroline Karaverdian, 9th Medical Group outpatient technician, files a folder in the patient health record department at the clinic at Beale Air Force Base, California, Feb. 4, 2020. On June 20 the 9th MDG will be going all-digital by transitioning to a new electronic health record called Military Health System GENESIS. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Valentina Viglianco)
Department of Defense Military Health System GENESIS logo (Courtesy Graphic)
Senior Airman Jennifer Carrier, assigned to the 319th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Detachment 1 as the unit deployment manager, stands in front of a Globalhawk on Beale Air Force Base, Calif., Jan. 31, 2020. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Jason W. Cochran)
Airman 1st Class Joshua Chatman, 9th Operations Support Squadron aircrew flight equipment specialist, places a strain relief cord back into an oxygen mask hose after cleaning it out, Jan. 22, 2020 at Beale Air Force Base, California. To ensure oxygen masks are properly functioning, aircrew flight equipment specialists inspect them every 30 days. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)
Airman 1st Class Maggie Breedlove, 9th Operations Support aircrew flight equipment specialist, measures and cuts Velcro pieces that will be placed in the inside of a flyers lightweight helmet, Jan. 22, 2020 at Beale Air Force Base, California. These pieces of Velcro will attach an energy absorbing liner to the helmet. The purpose of an energy absorbing liner is to reduce impact energy to the head of a pilot. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)
Wrenches lie in an aircraft mechanic’s toolbox at Beale Air Force Base, California, Jan. 27, 2020. Mechanics are vital to ensuring the readiness of the 9th Reconnaissance Wing’s intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance flying operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Valentina Viglianco)
Wesley Dietrich, 9th Maintenance Operation Squadron aircraft mechanic, runs an air speed test on a T-38 Talon at Beale Air Force Base, California, Jan. 27, 2020. A group of civilian contractors prepare T-38s for their daily flying schedules by refueling and inspecting the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Valentina Viglianco)
Wesley Dietrich, 9th Maintenance Operation Squadron aircraft mechanic, looks into a T-38 Talon cockpit during an air speed test at Beale Air Force Base, California, Jan. 27, 2020. This test measures the aircraft’s speed with a static tube system, which can determine the speed of the air flowing around the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Valentina Viglianco)
Wesley Dietrich, 9th Maintenance Operation Squadron aircraft mechanic, clicks a switch on a pressure-temperature test device at Beale Air Force Base, California, Jan. 27, 2020. The T-38s are part of the Companion Trainer Program for U-2 Dragon Lady pilots. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Valentina Viglianco)
Wesley Dietrich, 9th Maintenance Operation Squadron aircraft mechanic, looks into a T-38 Talon cockpit at Beale Air Force Base, California, Jan. 27, 2020. The T-38 is a twin-engine, high-altitude, supersonic jet trainer used in a variety of roles because of its ease of maintenance, elevated performance, and exceptional safety record. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Valentina Viglianco)

Chief's Corner

I am an American Airman

Too often I hear the statement, “The Air Force has no tradition…certainly not like the other services.” Or there’s the comment, “The Air Force changes everything all the time.  New uniforms, AFI’s, etc….how can we expect to maintain any heritage or tradition?”
I submit there is one decisive, deliberate, and motivating action each of us can take.  No matter the position you hold, the grade you wear, or if you are active duty, guard, reserve, retired, every single one of us can implement this small, yet powerful change today.  The change refers to a facet of our current culture.
Malcolm Gladwell speaks about culture change in his book, ‘Tipping Point’.  In his book, the author posits that even the smallest adjustments to habits, routines, or attitudes can have a significant impact on the culture or perception of an organization, population, or product.
Therefore, I challenge everyone to stop referring to members of our Air Force as ‘TROOPS’. 
According to Merriam-Webster, the primary definition of the word troop is:
a. A group of soldiers
b. A cavalry unit corresponding to an infantry company
c. A flock of mammals or birds
I understand a definition is literal, however, there are two problems with the way we throw this term around to refer to our Airmen.  First, the word troop is actually plural…referring to a group of soldiers.  Lastly, and most poignantly, the word troop is actually rooted in a tradition and heritage of another service.  And before we start the “But Chief, we were born out of the Army” conversation, I would ask you to consider a few points. 
We were born out of the Army for a reason.  We fulfill several needs that no other organization can: to keep up with advancing technology and to take warfighting to an entirely different level, both geographically and mentally.  The Army and Navy were long-time competitors for military leadership and neither service thought that the other should take on the new tasks of strategic deterrence missions associated with the advent of the atomic bomb.  This, along with many other great reasons, is why our Air Force, and our AIRMEN were created.
Think about it.  The United States Air Force was created for some of the most sophisticated warfare challenges of the time. 
So, let’s continue the tradition born in 1947 and call each other what we truly are.  Please, call me Airman.

Chief Hall

 

 

Phone Numbers

Public Affairs
  • 530-634-8887
Base Operator
  • 530-634-3000
Beale Straight Talk Line for emergency and alert information
  • 530-634-8889

ArticleCS

  • ACC commander immersed in U-2 reconnaissance mission

    Gen. Mike Holmes, commander of Air Combat Command, visited Beale Air Force Base Sept. 4 to 6. During the visit, Holmes was immersed in all aspects of the reconnaissance mission. He worked with the 9th Maintenance Group, 9th Physiological Support Squadron, and 9th Operations Group for his immersion, which included a high-flight in the U-2 Dragon Lady.
  • Reconnaissance deployment readiness at a moment’s notice

    It happens every day, an Airmen needs to deploy around the world at a moment’s notice. The 9th Logistics Readiness Squadron Individual Deployment Readiness Cell powers through any challenge getting them out the door rapidly and onto the front step of Combatant Commanders.
  • Beale Security Forces uses one shot AI enhancing capabilities

    Airmen form the 9th Security Forces Squadron have begun utilizing a sighting device during training which attaches to their weapon for precise shooting.
  • 372nd TRS Det. 21: Training future U-2 crew chiefs

    The 9th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron and its expeditionary counterparts’ crew chiefs are responsible for launching every U-2 Dragon Lady sortie across the globe. Before all of this, they must complete U-2 crew chief training at the 372nd Training Squadron Detachment 21. The detachment, which is attached to the 372nd TRS, Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, is located at Beale and is the only Mission Ready Airman (MRA) technical school for U-2s in the Air Force.
  • ACC defines HUR-RY, TOR-RY framework

    While specific start dates of tornado seasons vary based on region, they can happen at any time, day or night. On the other hand, Hurricane Season recently began on June 1 and will extend to Nov. 30. Due to catastrophic weather events that took place throughout the past 12 year, including Hurricane Michael and Hurricane Florence, the Air Force Severe Weather Readiness Assessment team recently developed an action plan for all at-risk installations across the United States.
  • 9th MXS propulsion shop essential to dragon’s roar

    The unmistakable roar of the U-2 Dragon Lady during takeoff and its vertical ascent can be heard far and wide across Beale just about every day of the week. While maintenance units from across the base are responsible for sortie production, the 9th Maintenance Squadron aerospace propulsion shop makes sure the roar isn’t a whimper.
  • Beale Lake Passage Project enhances partnership with California U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services

    Through the collaboration of the Air Force and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Beale Lake was surveyed for removal of its dam, a move that could help fall-run Chinook salmon and endangered steelhead migrate further upstream to a good spawning and rearing habitat.
  • 9th Civil Engineer Squadron fire department extinguish fire

    The 9th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighters responded to a fire near the Rod and Gun club July 18, 2019. The firefighters train regularly to battle wildland fires, which occur on and off base.
  • Airmen and former maintainers wash SR-71 Blackbird

    The Blackbird Maintainers group and a team of Beale volunteers took the time July 12, 2019 to wash the SR-71 Blackbird static display on base. This aircraft has a special place in our and the nation's history. It called Beale home from January 1966 to January 1990.
  • One Stop Shop, for career transitions at Beale

    Finding a job can be stressful for anyone. It can be especially stressful for an active duty member separating from the military, or a dependent who is relocating. Designed to help overcome this seemingly daunting task is Career One Stop, a career advisory tool that works closely alongside the Airmen and Family Readiness Center on Beale Air Force Base, California helps eliminate this stress for veterans and their families by providing classes, such as the Transition Assistance Program.
RSS

Mid-Air Collision Avoidance

Photo Studio

Book an appointment with 9th Reconnaissance Wing Public Affairs using SetMore