Maintenance beyond the aircraft

Senior Airman Simon Adeniji, 9th Physiological Support Squadron full pressure suit technician, performs a routine inspection on a full pressure suit Aug. 31, 2016, at Beale Air Force, California. Full pressure suits are worn by U-2 pilots to ensure their safety for flights that can go as high as 70,000 feet. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Senior Airman Simon Adeniji, 9th Physiological Support Squadron full pressure suit technician, performs a routine inspection on a full pressure suit Aug. 31, 2016, at Beale Air Force, California. Full pressure suits are worn by U-2 pilots to ensure their safety for flights that can go as high as 70,000 feet. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Senior Airman Simon Adeniji, 9th Physiological Support Squadron full pressure suit technician, tightens bolts during an inspection of a full pressure suit Aug. 31, 2016, at Beale Air Force Base, California. Inspections of the full pressure suits occur on a regular basis to check for any problems. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Senior Airman Simon Adeniji, 9th Physiological Support Squadron full pressure suit technician, tightens bolts during an inspection of a full pressure suit Aug. 31, 2016, at Beale Air Force Base, California. Inspections of the full pressure suits occur on a regular basis to check for any problems. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Harold R. Washington, 9th Physiological Support Squadron suit maintenance technician, inflates the life preserve device of a full pressure suit Aug. 31, 2016, at Beale Air Force Base, California. In the event of a crash the life preserve device is designed to inflate upon contact with water. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Harold R. Washington, 9th Physiological Support Squadron suit maintenance technician, inflates the life preserve device of a full pressure suit Aug. 31, 2016, at Beale Air Force Base, California. In the event of a crash the life preserve device is designed to inflate upon contact with water. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Senior Airman Mason Wyman, 9th Physiological Support Squadron full pressure suit technician, glues a face seal in the helmet Aug. 31, 2016, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The helmet provides the pilot with oxygen and keeps the pressure around the pilot's head stable. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Senior Airman Mason Wyman, 9th Physiological Support Squadron full pressure suit technician, glues a face seal in the helmet Aug. 31, 2016, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The helmet provides the pilot with oxygen and keeps the pressure around the pilot's head stable. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Reynato Ancheta, 9th Physiological Support Squadron full pressure suit technician, sows a hold down strap Aug. 31, 2016, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The hold down strap keeps the helmet in place when the suit expands, allowing the pilot to see clearly. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Reynato Ancheta, 9th Physiological Support Squadron full pressure suit technician, sows a hold down strap Aug. 31, 2016, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The hold down strap keeps the helmet in place when the suit expands, allowing the pilot to see clearly. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Airman 1st Class Heather Kennedy, 9th Physiological Support Squadron full pressure suit technician, inflates a full pressure suit to check if there are any leaks Aug. 31, 2016, at Beale Air Force Base, California.  The suit allows for the pilot to fly higher than Armstrong's line by maintaining pressure around the pilot. Armstrong's line is the altitude at which fluids begin to boil at human body temperature. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Airman 1st Class Heather Kennedy, 9th Physiological Support Squadron full pressure suit technician, inflates a full pressure suit to check if there are any leaks Aug. 31, 2016, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The suit allows for the pilot to fly higher than Armstrong's line by maintaining pressure around the pilot. Armstrong's line is the altitude at which fluids begin to boil at human body temperature. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Staff Sgt. Julie Orellana, 9th Physiological Support Squadron full pressure suit technician, inspects and repairs the weave net on a full pressure suit Aug. 31, 2016, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The weave net helps the suit maintain its shape and stops it from over expanding. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Staff Sgt. Julie Orellana, 9th Physiological Support Squadron full pressure suit technician, inspects and repairs the weave net on a full pressure suit Aug. 31, 2016, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The weave net helps the suit maintain its shape and stops it from over expanding. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Senior Airman Kaylee Wishowski, 9th Physiological Support Squadron full pressure suit technician, reviews the maintenance completed on a full pressure suit and ensures it is ready for the pilots to wear September 7, 2016, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The 9th Physiological Support Squadron Airmen deploy to forward operating locations worldwide in support of the U-2 mission. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Senior Airman Kaylee Wishowski, 9th Physiological Support Squadron full pressure suit technician, reviews the maintenance completed on a full pressure suit and ensures it is ready for the pilots to wear September 7, 2016, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The 9th Physiological Support Squadron Airmen deploy to forward operating locations worldwide in support of the U-2 mission. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

BEALE AIR FORCE, Calif. -- Airmen from the 9th Physiological Support Squadron perform daily maintenance on full pressure suits, which U-2 Dragon Lady pilots wear during their high-altitude flights. The maintenance ensures U-2 pilots are safe when they encounter the conditions of near-space flight.  The maintenance of full pressure suits is a necessary step to ensure Beale completes its high-altitude intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance mission.