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Beale’s 9th MDG completes exercise Ready Eagle

Senior Airman Cameron Harris, 9th Operational Medical Squadron bioenvironmental engineering journeyman, dawns protective gear while participating in exercise Ready Eagle, Aug. 6, at Beale Air Force Base, California.

Senior Airman Cameron Harris, 9th Operational Medical Squadron bioenvironmental engineering journeyman, dawns protective gear while participating in exercise Ready Eagle, Aug. 6, at Beale Air Force Base, California. Following the clearing of a building after a mass casualty event, bioenvironmental engineers suited up in full protective gear to check the site. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason W. Cochran)

9th Medical Group (MDG) Airmen practice decontamination procedures during exercise Ready Eagle Aug. 6, 2021, at Beale Air Force Base, California.

9th Medical Group (MDG) Airmen practice decontamination procedures during exercise Ready Eagle Aug. 6, 2021, at Beale Air Force Base, California. Mass decontamination was one of several capabilities that the 9th MDG tested during the exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexis R. Pentzer)

An Airman applies simulated wound makeup to another Airman’s arm during exercise Ready Eagle Aug. 6, 2021, at Beale Air Force Base, California.

An Airman applies simulated wound makeup to another Airman’s arm during exercise Ready Eagle Aug. 6, 2021, at Beale Air Force Base, California. Simulated wounds were applied to several Airmen who acted as victims of a mass casualty explosion, allowing 9th Medical Group medics to train on response procedures. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexis R. Pentzer)

Capt. Mike Migita, 9th Healthcare Operations Squadron pediatrician, provides information about the anthrax vaccine to Airman 1st Class Erika Claridy, 9th Operational Medical Readiness Squadron aerospace medical technician, Aug. 5, 2021, at Beale Air Force Base, California.

Capt. Mike Migita, 9th Healthcare Operations Squadron pediatrician, provides information about the anthrax vaccine to Airman 1st Class Erika Claridy, 9th Operational Medical Readiness Squadron aerospace medical technician, Aug. 5, 2021, at Beale Air Force Base, California. Migita and Claridy were participating in exercise Ready Eagle, an effort by the 9th Medical Group to demonstrate its medical and treatment readiness in crisis. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason W. Cochran)

9th Medical Group (MDG) Airmen bind a patient’s leg into a splint during exercise Ready Eagle Aug. 6th, at Beale Air Force Base, California.

9th Medical Group (MDG) Airmen bind a patient’s leg into a splint during exercise Ready Eagle Aug. 6th, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The exercise was held to test the 9th MDG’s readiness to respond to a series of events. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason W. Cochran)

Staff Sgt. Casey Mulcahy, 9th Operational Medical Readiness Squadron operational medicine independent duty medical technician, tourniquets  a patient’s simulated leg wound during exercise Ready Eagle Aug. 6, 2021, at Beale Air Force Base, California.

Staff Sgt. Casey Mulcahy, 9th Operational Medical Readiness Squadron operational medicine independent duty medical technician, tourniquets a patient’s simulated leg wound during exercise Ready Eagle Aug. 6, 2021, at Beale Air Force Base, California. As one of the first responders to the scene, Mulcahy was responsible for the initial treatment and triaging of patients. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason W. Cochran)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

The 9th Medical Group (MDG) executed exercise Ready Eagle Aug. 2 to 6, 2021, a weeklong endeavor designed to test all aspects of their readiness.

Throughout the week they completed classroom training sessions, table top exercises and a mass prophylaxis event, all leading up to their capstone on Aug. 6.

“On Aug. 6th, we had a simulated mass casualty event where I was part of the primary response and one of the first flight surgeons on the scene,” said Capt. Jonathan Mori, 99th Reconnaissance Squadron flight surgeon. “Essentially there was an explosion in one of the facilities on base resulting in about 15 to 20 casualties. Our first actions on scene were to triage patients using the Simple Triage And Rapid Transport protocol. Then depending on the priority or severity of the injury we initiated treatment of the patients in the field and coordinated transportation for the most critical patients.”

Exercises like this have been held by the 9th MDG in the past, said 1st Lt. Britny Connella, 9th Healthcare Operations Squadron laboratory services chief. What was new about the exercise was not only the scope, combining so many aspects of medical readiness, but also the sheer scale of it.

“This exercise truly covered every aspect of readiness for the 9th MDG,” said Connella. “Our bioenvironmental team was able to practice their skills in regards to identifying potential chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear, exposure, the clinical teams were able to practice skills needed for mass casualty instances and more. These skills are important but aren’t used often based on our location and the sheer fact that our patients here are strictly outpatient.”

The all encompassing nature of the exercise brought the entire MDG together, allowing people that don't normally work together, the opportunity to see how other career fields do their job.

“Personally I really learned a lot from this exercise and I had a great time working with my colleagues and people I don't normally work with on a daily basis,” said Mori. “I was able to solve problems with them, bond and build rapport.”

Frontline Airmen and 9th MDG leadership alike were able to take away several lessons learned from the exercise.

“In reflecting on what was taken away from this experience, I think Airmen were afforded the opportunity to really put their knowledge and skills to work,” said Connella. “The teams are able to see what their strengths are and what areas they are able to improve in. The level size of this exercise was much larger than any other we had done before, so I believe that Airman were able to get a full picture of how they each play a role in these situations and it gives them confidence to know what to do in these situations, because at any time, this could truly happen and the training will become real life.”