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The buzz around base

Blaze Baker, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron installation management flight chief, poses with a swarm of bees he caught at Beale Air Force Base, California, April 7, 2021.

Blaze Baker, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron installation management flight chief, poses with a swarm of bees he caught at Beale Air Force Base, California, April 7, 2021. This beehive is one of six that Baker has picked up around the base, not only saving them from extermination but allowing the entomology shop to focus their efforts elsewhere. (Courtesy Photo)

Bees sit on a frame.

Bees sit on a frame at Beale Air Force Base, California, May 17, 2021.This particular hive was being kept on Beale to build enough strength to be moved elsewhere. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Juliana Londono)

Blaze Baker separates frames to check on bees.

Blaze Baker, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron installation management flight chief, separates frames to check on bees at Beale Air Force Base, California, May 17, 2021. The frames that are held in the box are used by the bees to store their honey. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Juliana Londono)

Blaze Baker prepares a bee smoker to smoke out the bees in their hives.

Blaze Baker, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron installation management flight chief, prepares a bee smoker to smoke out the bees in their hives at Beale Air Force Base, California, May 17, 2021. The smoke causes bees to gorge on honey, in turn placing them into a calmer state. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Juliana Londono)

Blaze Baker prepares to smoke out a beehive.

Blaze Baker, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron installation management flight chief, prepares to smoke out a beehive at Beale Air Force Base, California, May 17, 2021. The smoke is used as a way to calm the bees down, making it easier for beekeepers to inspect the hive. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason Cochran)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

The environmental section of the 9th Civil Engineer Squadron here at Beale Air Force Base, California, plays an important role in keeping the environment safe. A prime example of this is Blaze Baker and his bees.

Blaze Baker, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron installation management flight chief, took the initiative in saving the bees here on base.

He has taken six hives from around base and has been keeping them here until they are strong enough to be relocated. By removing these hives, Baker has made it easier for the people of Recce Town to accomplish their missions.

“In a couple of cases, some projects we had would have been slowed down,” Baker said. “By the time they would have gotten an exterminator on base to deal with the bees at the Doolittle gate, that project would have been delayed a few more days.”

Baker, who has a long agricultural background enjoys getting things directly from nature, which he is able to do with these bees. He likes the process of taking something raw and converting it into a packaged product. Furthermore, he makes the lives of his coworkers easier by taking something off their plate.

“Our entomology shop is one or two people, so it's one less thing they have to do and we are salvaging something,” Baker said. “It's nice to keep the pollinators in the environment, even though they are not native, they are still serving a purpose.”

The environmental section of installation management is in charge of many things on base including the grazing program and the natural resource program. Like the environmental section, bees also play an important role in nature and without them, the world would be a very different place therefore it is important to take care of them whenever possible.

The installation management team works hard to continuously support conservation efforts on base. They plan to keep creating projects that will improve the environment in the future, continuing to make Beale a better place.