HomeNewsArticle Display

Recce Town Chapel Team organizes Spiritual ISR Program

Airmen attending the Spiritual ISR(Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance) Program build a catapult during a teamwork-building exercise, March 29, 2021, at Beale Air Force Base California. The Spiritual ISR Program was organized by the Recce Town Chaplain Team and gives junior airmen the tools to help guide members in need in the right direction. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

Airmen attending the Spiritual ISR(Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance) Program build a catapult during a teamwork-building exercise, March 29, 2021, at Beale Air Force Base California. The Spiritual ISR Program was organized by the Recce Town Chaplain Team and gives junior airmen the tools to help guide members in need in the right direction. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

Airmen attending the Spiritual ISR (Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance) Program, pose for a group photo during a hike, April 2, 2021. Spiritual ISR Airmen who’ve gone through the program can be a go-to person in their units for other junior airmen who might feel more comfortable approaching a peer, as opposed to a higher ranked individual. (Courtesy photo)

Airmen attending the Spiritual ISR (Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance) Program, pose for a group photo during a hike, April 2, 2021. Spiritual ISR Airmen who’ve gone through the program can be a go-to person in their units for other junior airmen who might feel more comfortable approaching a peer, as opposed to a higher ranked individual. (Courtesy photo)

Airman 1st Class Brian Westmoreland, 9th Maintenance Squadron aircraft fuel systems specialist, prepares to launch a ball from a catapult during a teamwork-building exercise, March 29, 2021, at Beale Air Force Base California. The teamwork-building exercise was part of the Spiritual ISR(Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance) Program. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

Airman 1st Class Brian Westmoreland, 9th Maintenance Squadron aircraft fuel systems specialist, prepares to launch a ball from a catapult during a teamwork-building exercise, March 29, 2021, at Beale Air Force Base California. The teamwork-building exercise was part of the Spiritual ISR(Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance) Program. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

Col. Heather Fox, 9th Reconnaissance Wing Commander, center, talks to Airmen attending the Spiritual ISR(Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance) Program, March 29, 2021, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The program is offered once every three months and is open to junior airmen who wish to create, discover, and enrich both aspects of their own lives and the lives of those they work with. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

Col. Heather Fox, 9th Reconnaissance Wing Commander, center, talks to Airmen attending the Spiritual ISR(Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance) Program, March 29, 2021, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The program is offered once every three months and is open to junior airmen who wish to create, discover, and enrich both aspects of their own lives and the lives of those they work with. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

On April 2, the first group of Airmen successfully completed the Spiritual ISR (Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance) Program. The Spiritual ISR Program was organized by the Recce Town Chaplain Team and gives junior airmen the tools to help guide members in need in the right direction.

The reason for giving junior airmen this training was to put eyes where the chapel might not be able to see.

“Following a series of suicides across the Air Force, the Recce Town Chaplain Team began researching ideas to help connect Airmen, grow them relationally and as leaders, and equip them with skills and resources needed to help other Airmen receive the help they need when facing life challenges,” said Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Christopher Underwood, 9th Reconnaissance Wing chaplain.

After considering various courses of action, the chapel decided to go with the Spiritual ISR Program. Spiritual ISR Airmen who’ve gone through the program can be a go-to person in their units for other junior airmen who might feel more comfortable approaching a peer, as opposed to a higher-ranked individual.

“This program makes Spiritual ISR Airmen an invaluable tool for their commanders by creating additional sensors within the units while also fostering a network of relationships across the wing that will last beyond the program,” said Chaplain (1st Lt.) Christian Beck, 9th Reconnaissance Wing chaplain.

Spiritual ISR Airmen are trained to be observant in and out of the workplace and notice when someone isn’t quite right. They are familiar with the various resources available to service members who aren’t doing well.

“Our goal is to reduce the stigma of getting help and create a core group of Airmen who are easily identified by their peers in their work centers as someone who can point them to the resources available in times of need,” said Master Sgt. Jere Ross, 9th Reconnaissance Wing superintendent of religious affairs.


The program is offered once every three months and is open to junior airmen who wish to create, discover, and enrich both aspects of their own lives and the lives of those they work with.


“We welcome all who wish to build strong relationships and desire to become someone that a commander can trust to know how Airmen can receive proper spiritual and mental support,” said chaplain Underwood.


For more information contact your Recce Town Chaplain team at (530) 634-4705