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Golf course closing, new recreational activities coming

A golf ball sits at the Coyote Run Golf Course Jan. 29, 2021 at Beale Air Force Base, California. Coyote Run Golf Course is currently in the process of being closed down due to decreased utilization and revenue generated from the course. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

A golf ball sits at the Coyote Run Golf Course Jan. 29, 2021 at Beale Air Force Base, California. Coyote Run Golf Course is currently in the process of being closed down due to decreased utilization and revenue generated from the course. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

Retired U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Denis Bissell prepares to putt a golf ball at the Coyote Run Golf Course Jan. 29, 2021 at Beale Air Force Base, California. Coyote Run Golf Course is currently in the process of being closed down due to decreased utilization and revenue generated from the course. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

Retired U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Denis Bissell prepares to putt a golf ball at the Coyote Run Golf Course Jan. 29, 2021 at Beale Air Force Base, California. Coyote Run Golf Course is currently in the process of being closed down due to decreased utilization and revenue generated from the course. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

Retired U.S. Army Staff Sgt. David Sparks places a golf ball down at the Coyote Run Golf Course Jan. 29, 2021 at Beale Air Force Base, California. Sparks is a regular golfer at the Coyote Run Golf Course. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

Retired U.S. Army Staff Sgt. David Sparks places a golf ball down at the Coyote Run Golf Course Jan. 29, 2021 at Beale Air Force Base, California. Sparks is a regular golfer at the Coyote Run Golf Course. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

Retired U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Denis Bissell plays golf at the Coyote Run Golf Course Jan. 29, 2021 at Beale Air Force Base, California. Coyote Run Golf Course has been seeing a loss of approximately $150,000 annually for the past six or seven years. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

Retired U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Denis Bissell plays golf at the Coyote Run Golf Course Jan. 29, 2021 at Beale Air Force Base, California. Coyote Run Golf Course has been seeing a loss of approximately $150,000 annually for the past six or seven years. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

The Coyote Run Golf Course at Beale Air Force Base, California is currently in the process of being closed down. The decision was made due to decreased utilization and revenue generated from the golf course.

“The decision has been made to close the course due to the history of excessive financial losses every year for the past six or seven years,” said James Buck, 9th Force Support Squadron deputy commander. “It’s unfortunate, but it comes down to basic business and the customer votes with their wallet.”

The course is funded by non-appropriated funds that come primarily from the sale of goods and services to Recce Town DoD military and civilian personnel and their families. According to Mr. Buck the course has been seeing a loss of approximately $150,000 a year for the past six or seven years.

Plans to reutilize the course, adding new recreational activities for Airmen and their families to enjoy are underway.

About two to three months after the golf course closes we will have an improved driving range, paint ball course, soccer golf course, and axe throwing area, said Col. Heather Fox, 9th Reconnaissance Wing commander. And one to two years after it closes we will have batting cages, mini golf, and a ropes course.

There is no official date set for the closure of the Coyote Run Golf Course. The closure package is currently in the last stages of approval at Air Force higher headquarters.

“It’s a sad thing, but we are trying to turn it around into something Airmen will use more,” said Buck.