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9th CES firefighters assist in ecological study

A milkweed plant sits in a field while 9th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighters manage a prescribed fire on Beale Air Force Base.

A milkweed plant sits in a field while 9th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighters manage a prescribed fire on Beale Air Force Base, California, June 19, 2020. This prescribed fire was set to gain a better understanding of how wildfires impact milkweed, a part of the monarch butterfly’s life cycle. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason W. Cochran)

A 9th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter observes a prescribed fire on Beale Air Force Base.

A 9th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter observes a prescribed fire on Beale Air Force Base, California, June 19, 2020. Prescribed fires provide firefighters an incredible perspective on how wildfires behave, giving them an increased capability to combat unprescribed fires. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason W. Cochran)

Jaymee Marty, ecologist shares findings from a prescribed fire with Lt. Col. Travis Guidt, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron commander, on Beale Air Force Base.

Jaymee Marty, ecologist, left, shares findings from a prescribed fire with Lt. Col. Travis Guidt, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron commander, on Beale Air Force Base, California, June 19, 2020. This prescribed fire was set to gain a better understanding of how wildfires impact milkweed, a part of the monarch butterfly’s life cycle. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason W. Cochran)

Airman 1st Class Kira Krueger, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, cuts line to contain a prescribed fire on Beale Air Force Base.

Airman 1st Class Kira Krueger, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighter, cuts line to contain a prescribed fire on Beale Air Force Base, California, June 19, 2020. Prescribed fires are intentionally set and managed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jason W. Cochran)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --