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It isn’t broke unless we can’t fix it

AFREP works on various equipment from printers, monitors, electronics to U-2 Dragonlady components and so much more.

The entrance to Air Force Repair Enhancement Program (AFREP) is secured due to equipment and items that could be high voltage at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 4, 2020. AFREP works on various equipment from printers, monitors, electronics to U-2 Dragonlady components and so much more. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

AFREP Airmen document the work they do so they can create procedures and instructions on how they fixed the damaged equipment.

Staff Sgt. Travis Hamm, 9th Maintenance Group Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician, holds the wires of a damaged cable to test it at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 4, 2020. AFREP Airmen document the work they do so they can create procedures and instructions on how they fixed the damaged equipment. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

Technician, solders components on a circuit board at Beale Air Force Base.

Staff Sgt. Ryan Wensel, 9th Maintenance Group Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician, solders components on a circuit board at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 4, 2020. AFREP Airmen save the Air Force money by learning how to repair items instead of sending off items and paying to have it fixed. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

Technician touches the part that he is working on to feel for any damages at Beale Air Force Base

Staff Sgt. Ryan Wensel, 9th Maintenance Group Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician, touches the part that he is working on to feel for any damages at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 4, 2020. AFREP Airmen save the Air Force money by learning how to repair items instead of sending off items and paying to have it fixed. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

AFREP Airmen work on various aircraft parts, flight line test equipment and electronics.

Staff Sgt. Ryan Wensel, 9th Maintenance Group Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician, works on a circuit board at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 4, 2020. AFREP Airmen work on various aircraft parts, flight line test equipment and electronics. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

Technician uses a scalpel to cut into the protective coating of a component at Beale Air Force Base

Staff Sgt. Ryan Wensel, 9th Maintenance Group Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician, uses a scalpel to cut into the protective coating of a component at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 4, 2020. With multiple toolboxes AFREP Airmen can work on any equipment big or small. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

Technician works on a circuit board by soldering components at Beale Air Force Base.

Staff Sgt. Ryan Wensel, 9th Maintenance Group Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician, works on a circuit board by soldering components at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 4, 2020. AFREP Airmen work on various aircraft parts, flight line test equipment and electronics. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

AFREP Airmen work on tiny parts that need to be magnified in order to see what they are doing.

Staff Sgt. Ryan Wensel, 9th Maintenance Group Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician, looks through a microscope to work on a detailed component at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 4, 2020. AFREP Airmen work on tiny parts that need to be magnified in order to see what they are doing. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

Beale Air Force Base, California --

Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technicians (AFREP) are a small but mighty group of Airmen who keep the mission going on a microscopic level.

While many Air Force careers in the maintenance group see the fruits of their labor, the AFREP makes sure that those Airman can accomplish their job.

“This position is unique because it allows me to see the world from a detailed perspective and you don’t realize how many components really make a plane fly or computer operate.” Said Staff Sgt. Ryan Wensel, 9th Maintenance Group Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician

From office electronics, equipment, to aircraft computer parts and much more, these technicians are always ready to save the Air Force time, money and valuable equipment.

With the Fiscal year of 2020, AFREP was able to put $67,656 back into the flying funds at Beale Air Force Base and with the various repairable items around the base they were able to save the Air Force $357,272.

“Knowing that we are the handy men here at Beale and we can help save not only Beale, but the Air Force money makes me feel like I’m a part of the bigger picture,” said Staff Sgt. Travis Hamm, 9th Maintenance Group Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician, “Our motto is “It ain’t broke unless we can’t fix it”

“We never know what we are walking into that day so it’s a challenge but also fun to learn and push ourselves to constantly grow.” Said Hamm.

AFREP Airmen don’t always have manuals to use when fixing parts so they become creative in their process.

“When there is a defective cable you use a good cable to map out how it should look and take notes and this is the process of learning and fixing at the same time.” Said Hamm.

Like any other shop, AFREP Airmen want to make sure they are providing to the mission and want to make sure they are constantly evolving their skills and knowledge.

“I throw on my music and open up my operations procedures and dive into this world that very many people don’t get to see,” said Wensel, “Someone will bring in a product that needs to be fixed and we learn how to fix it then we fix it! It can be a power supply for a U-2 Dragonlady or a printer, but we are nonstop learning and figuring things out!”

For more information on what AFREP can fix contact: 530-634-8281