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Windshield Damage On The Road

A contracted truck drives off after being weighed in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. There are some indicators that can be used to identify a truck but the license tags are not good indicators to use because the trailer gets switched multiple times to different trucks. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

A contracted truck drives off after being weighed in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. There are some indicators that can be used to identify a truck but the license tags are not good indicators to use because the trailer gets switched multiple times to different trucks. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

Members of the 9th Reconnaissance Wing safety office meet and talk with Lloyd Burns, Western Aggregates vice president (center), in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. Meeting with Western Aggregate gave a chance for both groups to work together and figure out a better solution to help Airmen and families. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

Members of the 9th Reconnaissance Wing safety office meet and talk with Lloyd Burns, Western Aggregates vice president (center), in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. Meeting with Western Aggregate gave a chance for both groups to work together and figure out a better solution to help Airmen and families. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

Lana Sharp, Western Aggregates weight master (left), and Lloyd Burns, vice president, communicates with trucks in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. The weight master logs their information into the system as they leave the construction yard. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

Lana Sharp, Western Aggregates weight master (left), and Lloyd Burns, vice president, communicates with trucks in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. The weight master logs their information into the system as they leave the construction yard. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

A contracted truck drives onto the weight bay in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. Some indicators that can be used to identify a truck would be the five digit number (circled in red) that allows you to contact the company about any incident (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

A contracted truck drives onto the weight bay in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. Some indicators that can be used to identify a truck would be the five digit number (circled in red) that allows you to contact the company about any incident (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

Lana Sharp, Western Aggregates weight master, communicates with trucks in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. The weight master logs their information into the system as they leave the construction yard. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

Lana Sharp, Western Aggregates weight master, communicates with trucks in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. The weight master logs their information into the system as they leave the construction yard. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

A contracted truck driver communicates with the weight master his information in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. Some indicators that can be used to identify a truck would be the five digit number (circled in red) that allows you to contact the company about any incident (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

A contracted truck driver communicates with the weight master his information in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. Some indicators that can be used to identify a truck would be the five digit number (circled in red) that allows you to contact the company about any incident (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

A contracted truck driver communicates with the weight master his information in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. Some indicators that can be used to identify a truck would be the five digit number (circled in red) that allows you to contact the company about any incident (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

A contracted truck driver communicates with the weight master his information in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. Some indicators that can be used to identify a truck would be the five digit number (circled in red) that allows you to contact the company about any incident (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

Lana Sharp, Western Aggregates weight master, holds the five digit decal sticker at the weight station in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. The decal can be located on the truck for identifying who owns the truck. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

Lana Sharp, Western Aggregates weight master, holds the five digit decal sticker at the weight station in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. The decal can be located on the truck for identifying who owns the truck. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

A contracted truck drives off after being weighed in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. There are some indicators that can be used to identify a truck but the license tags are not good indicators to use because the trailer gets switched multiple times to different trucks. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

A contracted truck drives off after being weighed in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. There are some indicators that can be used to identify a truck but the license tags are not good indicators to use because the trailer gets switched multiple times to different trucks. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

A contracted truck drives off after being weighed in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. There are some indicators that can be used to identify a truck but the license tags are not good indicators to use because the trailer gets switched multiple times to different trucks. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)
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A contracted truck drives off after being weighed in Marysville, California, Oct. 10, 2019. There are some indicators that can be used to identify a truck but the license tags are not good indicators to use because the trailer gets switched multiple times to different trucks. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Colville McFee)

Beale Air Froce Base, California --

Many people have expressed concern about the truck drivers on the road around Beale and how the gravel they carry damage the roads and windshields. Beale partnered with Western Aggregates Company to find a solution on how we can help the community.

Beale compiled reports about damage sustained to vehicles from rock trucks. The following is data was collected from that inquiry: 182 total reported incidents, 167 windshields damaged, 14 reports of serious damage to the car itself, 29 members reported incomplete information, 26 members reported the actual damage estimates to their vehicle totaling $16,400, Reports date from 2016 to the present day.

9th Reconnaissance Wing Safety met with Western Aggregates Company to learn about the way the company delivers the gravel.

“Western Aggregates is a construction materials company that produce crushed rock, sand and gravel that are used in numerous projects from road paving, buildings and concrete,” said Lloyd Burns, Western Aggregates vice president of operations.

Western Aggregates is a supplier and once a company request the product, they come to an agreement or contract to sell to the company.

“The buyer of our material hires contracted truck drivers to come and pick up the required load and deliver it,” said Burns. ”Once the contract has been made, the contracted driver acquires the load and it no longer belongs to Western Aggregates.”

Western Aggregates continues to receive numerous complaints and calls for damages to vehicles.

“People get mad at us and we are trying to find a way to be transparent and we are not unwilling to help but once the contracted truck driver leaves, it’s no longer our property, it’s the buyer’s property.” said Burns. “We realize that people call us and give us the license tag of the trucks but those don’t work in our system, but with Safety’s help this is the best way to educate everyone on what to do.”

Western Aggregates explained to Safety what to identify as a way to bridge the gap of information and help those who have been involved.

There are a series of numbers located on the front and sides of the truck that are useful to identify a truck and the company. These numbers are a five digits and located in various places on the front of the truck.

“We do our best to ensure the contracted drivers follow the regulations when transporting our gravel to locations. You should never see gravel above the top of the truck,” said Burns. “It should be six inches below the top in the center and one foot below the top on all sides.”

Once contracted drivers leave the Western Aggregates property they can pull over and readjust the load.

“It’s paramount to pay attention to driving on the road, like no distracted driving or speeding,” said Burns. “We do our best to be safe by hiring street sweepers and water tanks to get the rocks out of the road.”

Meeting with Safety and Western Aggregates shed light on a lot of information.

“We really considered this moment with Western Aggregates an opportunity for transparency, growth and education. We are going to continue to work with the company to figure out more ways to help Airmen and families moving forward.” Said Staff Sgt. Perrin Stegall, 9th Reconnaissance Wing Safety.

For more information please contact 9th Reconnaissance Wing Safety:  530-634-0500/8878