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9th SFS implements shift change, experience improvements

9th SFS implements shift change, experience improvements

Airman 1st Class Taquita Clark, 9th Security Forces Squadron entry controller, stands guard at Wheatland Gate as vehicles make their approach Jan. 31, 2019, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. The recent shift change is not only allowing defenders to have more time off between shifts, but allows them have more energy and focus for their day to day tasks. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Benjamin Bugenig)

9th SFS implements shift change, experience improvements

Airman 1st Class Kaiulani Gutierrez (left) and Airman 1st Class Taquita Clark (right), 9th Security Forces Squadron entry controllers prepare for incoming vehicles Jan. 31, 2019, at Beale Air Force Base, Calif. After switching from 12-hour shifts to eight hour shifts, defenders are able to appreciate the job more and keep a smile on their face. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Senior Airman Benjamin Bugenig)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

The 9th Security Forces Squadron is always looking for ways to evolve and provide Beale with better security, and as a way to do so the unit went from running 12-hour shifts to 8-hour shifts.

 

“Sustaining eights is a huge thing we look at as leadership to make sure we are providing our Airmen with the best quality of life we can give them,” said Master Sgt. Scott Downing, 9th SFS flight chief. “A 12-hour shift for us works out to be a 14- or 15-hour shift.”

 

Since the shift change there has been an increase in morale across the squadron according to Downing and Staff Sgt. Ronnie Moore, 9th SFS flight chief.

 

“A lot of the Airmen like going from 12s to eights simply because it gives them more off time with their family after the duty day,” said Moore.

 

In addition to increasing morale, Downing believes it has caused a more robust security presence.

 

“I believe it has increased the base security,” said Downing. “The more hours they work the less they are going to be able to focus, so if we can cut some of the hours back we get more time where they are vigilant and doing their job effectively.”

 

Beyond the anecdotal evidence, there has also been an increase in career development course scores and a decrease in physical fitness test failure, which translates to the day-to-day job.

 

“For us it is not just about showing up to work. We have proficiency firing, training we have to conduct, and PT,” said Downing. “With the extra rest we are more focused and driven to excel.”