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Recce Town secures contract for T-38 sun shades

U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 94th Aircraft Maintenance Unit and the 27th Fighter Wing finish inspecting an F-22 Raptor at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., June 26, 2017. The newly built sun shelters are equipped with lights that illuminate the entire aircraft during hours of darkness, allowing those working under them to have better visualization. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Tristan Biese)

U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 94th Aircraft Maintenance Unit and the 27th Fighter Wing finish inspecting an F-22 Raptor at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., June 26, 2017. The newly built sun shelters are equipped with lights that illuminate the entire aircraft during hours of darkness, allowing those working under them to have better visualization. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Tristan Biese)

A U.S. Air Force crew chief assigned to the 27th Fighter Wing walks between sun shelters on the flightline at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., June 19, 2017. The newly built sun shelters can now assist in the protection of the Airmen from rain and sun rays. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Tristan Biese)

A U.S. Air Force crew chief assigned to the 27th Fighter Wing walks between sun shelters on the flightline at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., June 19, 2017. The newly built sun shelters can now assist in the protection of the Airmen from rain and sun rays. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Tristan Biese)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

The 9th Reconnaissance Wing recently secured a contract for three new sun shades for the T-38 Talon apron

 

The project was a wing-level initiative to provide maintenance personal with better working conditions.

 

“We are getting three sun shades, which will cover nine aircraft,” Rick Axe, T-38 Talon maintenance supervisor. “The mechanics will be able to do their job in a better environment. They will be out of the rain and sun. They will be lighted and they will have power there, so we can work in the evening.”

 

Axe also believes the shades will help save money by prolonging the life of the aircraft by protecting them from the various weather conditions in Northern California.

 

“The avionics package are electronic so the hotter it gets the harder they work,” Axe said. “Being out of the sun will give extended life to our avionics. The serviceability of our parts will also last longer.”

 

The sun shades are made by Big Top Shelters and will be 166 feet wide, 66 feet long, and 40 feet center height.

 

According to the 9th Contracting Squadron, the project cost approximately $1.03 million and they are scheduled to be completed within the next 100 days.

 

“The sun shades provide an important service in protecting the pilots, maintenance personnel, and the aircraft from the elements,” said Col. Andrew Werner, 9th Operations Group commander. “A huge piece of building a world class ops and maintenance team is providing our people with the best facilities money can buy.”