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New RPA career field graduates first RQ-4 pilots

Second Lieutenants Scott (right) and Jacob (left) pose in front of an RQ-4 Global Hawk at the Beale AFB, Calif., flight line Jan. 13, 2012. Lieutenants Jacob and Scott became the first 18X pilots in the Air Force to complete RQ-4 Global Hawk training and were honored during a winging ceremony at the 1st Reconnaissance Squadron’s Dively Theater. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Shawn Nickel/Released/Portions of this photo have been masked due to operational security reasons)

Second Lieutenants Scott (right) and Jacob (left) pose in front of an RQ-4 Global Hawk at the Beale AFB, Calif., flight line Jan. 13, 2012. Lieutenants Jacob and Scott became the first 18X pilots in the Air Force to complete RQ-4 Global Hawk training and were honored during a winging ceremony at the 1st Reconnaissance Squadron’s Dively Theater. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Shawn Nickel/Released/Portions of this photo have been masked due to operational security reasons)

Second Lieutenant Jacob receives his remotely piloted aircraft wings from his wife, 2nd Lt. Rachael, during a winging ceremony at the 1st Reconnaissance Squadron's Dively Theater, Beale AFB, Calif., Jan. 13, 2012. 2nd Lt. Jacob, along with 2nd Lt. Scott, was one of the first two RQ-4 Global Hawk pilots to join the new 18X career field. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Shawn Nickel/Released/Portions of this photo have been masked due to operational security reasons)

Second Lieutenant Jacob receives his remotely piloted aircraft wings from his wife, 2nd Lt. Rachael, during a winging ceremony at the 1st Reconnaissance Squadron's Dively Theater, Beale AFB, Calif., Jan. 13, 2012. 2nd Lt. Jacob, along with 2nd Lt. Scott, was one of the first two RQ-4 Global Hawk pilots to join the new 18X career field. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Shawn Nickel/Released/Portions of this photo have been masked due to operational security reasons)

Brig. Gen. Paul McGillicuddy, 9th Reconnaissance Wing commander, presents a certificate to 2nd Lt. Scott during a winging ceremony at the 1st Reconnaissance Squadron's Dively Theater, Beale AFB, Calif., Jan. 13, 2012. 2nd Lt. Scott, along with 2nd Lt. Jacob, was one of the first two RQ-4 Global Hawk pilots to join the new 18X career field. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Shawn Nickel/Released/Portions of this photo have been masked due to operational security reasons)

Brig. Gen. Paul McGillicuddy, 9th Reconnaissance Wing commander, presents a certificate to 2nd Lt. Scott during a winging ceremony at the 1st Reconnaissance Squadron's Dively Theater, Beale AFB, Calif., Jan. 13, 2012. 2nd Lt. Scott, along with 2nd Lt. Jacob, was one of the first two RQ-4 Global Hawk pilots to join the new 18X career field. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Shawn Nickel/Released/Portions of this photo have been masked due to operational security reasons)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif., -- Two members of Team Beale were recognized as the first RQ-4 Global Hawk pilots in the new 18X career field during a winging ceremony Jan. 13 at the 1st Reconnaissance Squadron's Dively Theater.

Second Lieutenants Jacob and Scott began training Oct. 3, 2011 after a decision by Air Staff officials in June 2011 established undergraduate training for remotely piloted aircraft pilots across the service.

"It's history repeating itself to have our pilots ushering in this new time in our career field," said Lt. Col. Steve, squadron commander. "The 1st RS, previously the 1st Aero Squadron, was the first [flying squadron in history]."

The new classification 18X is designated for RPA pilots coming from non-rated career fields as well as newly commissioned officers. The commander said selection standards for this program are rigorous, to include physiological and academic requirements.

"With these pilots not coming from traditional training and not being experienced aviators, this is untested territory. But the stringent requirements the Air Force has in place will ensure success," said Colonel Steve.

The pilots will begin flying operational and humanitarian missions immediately in support of combatant commanders worldwide.

"We were told we were leading a newly edged sword into the Air Force and this has become a reality," said Lieutenant Scott. "It's a privilege to be the first in this platform at this capacity. I'm ready to become part of such an intense history and pave the way for the rest of the pipeline students."

Colonel Steve said the current plan is to convert all RQ-4 pilots to the new career field beginning with 40 percent of the trainees by the end of 2012.

"Based on the performance of these two Airmen, I have high hopes for the future of the program and the 18X pilots," he said. "It's bringing a youthful dynamic to the RPA program which will bring it to new heights."