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ACC commander highlights Beale ISR mission

Gen. Hawk Carlisle, commander of Air Combat Command, is briefed on the U-2 Dragon Lady aircraft by Master. Sgt. Bandele Howes, 9th Maintenance Squadron assistant fabrication flight chief Feb. 9, 2016, during his visit to Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Carlisle toured many facilities and visited with Airmen of the 9th Reconnaissance Wing with a focus on the intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance enterprise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Schultze)

Gen. Hawk Carlisle, commander of Air Combat Command, is briefed on the U-2 Dragon Lady aircraft by Master. Sgt. Bandele Howes, 9th Maintenance Squadron assistant fabrication flight chief Feb. 9, 2016, during his visit to Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Carlisle toured many facilities and visited with Airmen of the 9th Reconnaissance Wing with a focus on the intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance enterprise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Schultze)

Gen. Hawk Carlisle, commander of Air Combat Command, greets Airmen from the 9th Maintenance Squadron Feb. 9, 2016, during his visit to Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Carlisle visited Beale to receive a first-hand perspective of high-altitude intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Schultze)

Gen. Hawk Carlisle, commander of Air Combat Command, greets Airmen from the 9th Maintenance Squadron Feb. 9, 2016, during his visit to Beale Air Force Base, Calif. Carlisle visited Beale to receive a first-hand perspective of high-altitude intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Schultze)

Gen. Hawk Carlisle, commander of Air Combat Command, briefs members of Team Beale Feb. 9, 2016, during his visit to Beale Air Force Base, Calif. At the all-call, Carlisle recapped the findings of the Culture and Process Improvement Program, an initiative which studied challenges within the remotely piloted aircraft and Distributed Common Ground System enterprise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Schultze)

Gen. Hawk Carlisle, commander of Air Combat Command, briefs members of Team Beale Feb. 9, 2016, during his visit to Beale Air Force Base, Calif. At the all-call, Carlisle recapped the findings of the Culture and Process Improvement Program, an initiative which studied challenges within the remotely piloted aircraft and Distributed Common Ground System enterprise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Schultze)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- U.S. Air Force Gen. Hawk Carlisle, commander of Air Combat Command, visited Beale Air Force Base to experience the multi-faceted mission of the 9th Reconnaissance Wing and the 548th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Group Feb. 9, 2016.

During a base all-call, he discussed the Culture and Process Improvement Program and input received through surveys that were conducted to assess the climate of the remotely piloted aircraft community and Distributed Common Ground System.

"My hat is off to the 548th Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance Group and the 9th Reconnaissance Wing on their participation in the CPIP. We are hearing what is going on in the ISR community and looking into the best ways to take care of you" Carlisle said.

He also spoke of the recent announcement concerning the Air Force implementing enlisted RPA pilots.

"I have full faith and confidence that our enlisted force is capable," he said. "I've seen firsthand, time and time again, that superb leadership, professionalism and skills of our enlisted force. The introduction of enlisted RQ-4 pilots must be done properly and on a realistic timeline. This is a major paradigm shift that will yield great dividends for our Airmen and our Air Force."

He also discussed manning issues facing the Air Force in general as well as the RPA community specifically.

"ISR is a top combatant commander requirement and will remain so for the foreseeable future," he said. "Minimizing operational risk and balancing ISR capability across the range of military operations with finite resources remains a challenge."

Carlisle said the members of Beale and the future of the RPA enterprise will continue to play a huge role in furthering our national security interests.

"The job that each and every one of you train for, support and execute on a daily basis is important," he said. "There are days you may not feel that way, but trust me when I tell you that it is. You support a critical mission that is in high-demand of combatant commanders and I want to personally thank you for all that you do."