Beale Airmen conduct integrated emergency response training

Airman 1st Class Robert Rybicky (left), 9th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental technician, and Senior Airman Kent Hunter, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management technician, walk to a simulated hazardous scene for an exercise on June 10, 2015 at Beale Air Force Base, California. The exercise was part of the Integrated Base Emergency Response Capabilities Training designed to strengthen Airmen’s emergency response skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Preston L. Cherry/Released)

Airman 1st Class Robert Rybicky (left), 9th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental technician, and Senior Airman Kent Hunter, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management technician, walk to a simulated hazardous scene for an exercise on June 10, 2015 at Beale Air Force Base, California. The exercise is a part of the Integrated Base Emergency Response Capabilities Training designed to strengthen Airmen’s emergency response skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Preston L. Cherry/Released)

A Beale Airman receives a medical examination during a simulated hazardous scene as part of an exercise on June 10, 2015 at Beale Air Force Base, California. The exercise was part of the Integrated Base Emergency Response Capabilities Training designed to strengthen Airmen’s emergency response skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Preston L. Cherry/Released)

Airman Julie Fuller, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management technician receives a medical examination during a simulated hazardous scene as part of an exercise on June 10, 2015 at Beale Air Force Base, California. The exercise is a part of the Integrated Base Emergency Response Capabilities Training designed to strengthen Airmen’s emergency response skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Preston L. Cherry/Released)

SSgt Michaela Spiegle (right), 9th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental engineering technician, briefs Carey Waddell, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron exercise incident commander, as part of an exercise on June 11, 2015 at Beale Air Force Base, California. The exercise was part of the Integrated Base Emergency Response Capabilities Training designed to strengthen Airmen’s emergency response skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Preston L. Cherry/Released)

SSgt Michaela Spiegle (right), 9th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental engineering technician, briefs Carey Waddell, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron exercise incident commander, as part of an exercise on June 11, 2015 at Beale Air Force Base, California. The exercise is a part of the Integrated Base Emergency Response Capabilities Training designed to strengthen Airmen’s emergency response skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Preston L. Cherry/Released)

A Beale emergency management technician, from the 9th Civil Engineering Squadron, samples a chemical found at a simulated hazardous scene as part of an exercise on June 10, 2015 at Beale Air Force Base, California. The exercise was part of the Integrated Base Emergency Response Capabilities Training designed to strengthen Airmen’s emergency response skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Preston L. Cherry/Released)

A Beale emergency management technician, from the 9th Civil Engineer Squadron, samples a chemical found at a simulated hazardous scene as part of an exercise on June 10, 2015 at Beale Air Force Base, California. The exercise is a part of the Integrated Base Emergency Response Capabilities Training designed to strengthen Airmen’s emergency response skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Preston L. Cherry/Released)

Airman 1st Class Robert Rybicky, 9th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental technician, begins decontamination as part of an exercise on June 11, 2015 at Beale Air Force Base, California. The exercise was part of the Integrated Base Emergency Response Capabilities Training designed to strengthen Airmen’s emergency response skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Preston L. Cherry/Released)

Airman 1st Class Robert Rybicky, 9th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental technician, begins decontamination as part of an exercise on June 11, 2015 at Beale Air Force Base, California. The exercise is a part of the Integrated Base Emergency Response Capabilities Training designed to strengthen Airmen’s emergency response skills. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Preston L. Cherry/Released)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, California -- Fire and emergency services, emergency management and bioenvironmental engineering Airmen participated in an integrated emergency response capability training exercise here June 8 to 12, 2015.

Airmen responded to a variety of hazardous material, major accident and natural disaster scenarios. Participants took the opportunity to improve emergency response skills without the stress of an actual crisis.

"During the week, the team comes in, and they do a building block approach for an all-hazards response," said Bob Coffelt, emergency operations center manager. "They first perform academic training and then move to the field and given increasingly more challenging scenarios involving a hazardous substance."

The trainees began by setting up a base camp outside of the hazardous area with mobile response units. Just like in an actual emergency, the incident commander assesses the situation and coordinates an appropriate response through the EOC and supporting agencies. The nature of the exercise provides realistic feedback.

"There is no one shoe that fits all when it comes to emergency response procedures, but what they teach and point out for us when it comes to the different exercises provides good information," said Senior Airman Kent Hunter, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management technician. "It definitely shows us where we are a little bit weaker, so we can actually focus on improving in those areas."

A team contracted by Air Combat Command oversaw the planning and execution of the training.

"In the beginning of the week, they are kind of intimidated, nervous, and scared," said Joe Potaczek, a contractor. "By the end of the week...you really can see their confidence increase."