November offers opportunity to spotlight diabetes prevention

The Center For Disease Control defines diabetes as a group of diseases marked by high levels of glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action or both, and estimates the rate of diabetes in the military at about 5 percent.

The Center For Disease Control defines diabetes as a group of diseases marked by high levels of glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action or both, and estimates the rate of diabetes in the military at about 5 percent.

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - -- Every 19 seconds someone in the U.S. is diagnosed with diabetes according to the American Diabetes Association. This important health issue is being spotlighted during the month of November, National Diabetes Awareness Month.  Diabetes affects nearly 30 million children and adults in the U.S. today, nearly 10 percent of the population.

Throughout the month of November the 9th Medical Group is providing information at different locations on Beale Air Force Base, to include the Commissary and the Base Exchange as well as offering free blood pressure checks at those locations.

The Center For Disease Control defines diabetes as "a group of diseases marked by high levels of glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action or both, and estimates the rate of diabetes in the military at about 5 percent."

Noemi Horario is the Disease Manager for the 9th Medical Group at Beale and diabetes is her major focus. In terms of preventative measures she recommends eating healthy and exercising, because those are the factors you can control.

"The goal is for diabetes patients to lead a normal life and to get their blood sugar down to a normal level, typically 6 or below. We also want to make sure that they have no complications."

According to diabetes.org Type 1 diabetes usually affects children and young adults, and is characterized by the absence of insulin production by the body. Type 2 diabetes, which usually begins as insulin resistance, accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. Gestational diabetes is a form of glucose intolerance diagnosed during pregnancy.

"Prevention is not necessarily going on diets all the time or just trying to lose weight in general, it is lifestyle changes. Instead of focusing on losing 15 or 20 pounds at once, try to make good decisions in your food intake. And make sure you are getting enough exercise," said Major Earnest Mullen, 9th Medical Group Medical Management Director.  "With diet you should look to avoid excess sugars and refined sugars and make sure you are eating enough fruits and vegetables it is a good way to watch your weight and make sure you are staying healthy in general."

With the cost of associated healthcare for diagnosed diabetes estimated at $245 billion dollars in the U.S., it poses a major challenge for the country moving forward.

For more information about diabetes and ways to prevent it, visit:

www.hnfs.com

www.diabetes.org

www.ndep.nih.gov

www.mayoclinic.com