Victim Advocates profiles, they are here to help

Senior Master Sgt. Burrel McCollum Jr. became a Victim Advocate after many experiences during his 14 years as a member of security forces. He believes it is important to be an advocate providing help to someone on their worst day. He also wanted to get involved in victim advocacy so victims will know they are not alone and there will be someone to help them through their toughest moments. For more information about SARC programs call Ms. Lucero at 634-4000, option two.
(U.S. Air Force courtesy photo)

Senior Master Sgt. Burrel McCollum Jr. became a Victim Advocate after many experiences during his 14 years as a member of security forces. He believes it is important to be an advocate providing help to someone on their worst day. He also wanted to get involved in victim advocacy so victims will know they are not alone and there will be someone to help them through their toughest moments. For more information about SARC programs call Ms. Lucero at 634-4000, option two. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo)

Tech. Sgt. Daniel Drennen has worked in almost every major functional area in the military including being a mentor and supervisor to young Airmen.  He intends to become a first sergeant because he cares about people and can relate to their circumstances in some way. Being and victim advocate is important to Drennen because he cares about his fellow Airmen and can be a flexible good listener. For more information about SARC programs call Ms. Lucero at 634-4000, option two. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo)

Tech. Sgt. Daniel Drennen has worked in almost every major functional area in the military including being a mentor and supervisor to young Airmen. He intends to become a first sergeant because he cares about people and can relate to their circumstances in some way. Being and victim advocate is important to Drennen because he cares about his fellow Airmen and can be a flexible good listener. For more information about SARC programs call Ms. Lucero at 634-4000, option two. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif., -- Victim Advocates provide essential support, liaison services, and care to victims of sexual assault. The Victim Advocate ensures victims continue to receive the necessary care and support until they no longer requires services. They provide crisis intervention, referral, and ongoing support, including providing information on available options and resources to assist the victim in making informed decisions about the case.

Victim Advocates can meet with a victim at any time and provide them with details on the sexual assault response process, including information about unrestricted and restricted reporting. In fact, a victim can report a sexual assault to a Victim Advocate and preserve the option of a restricted report. Victim Advocates may accompany the victim, if requested, during investigative interviews and or medication examinations. A recent change to the Military Rules of Evidence grants confidential communication between the victim and Victim Advocates. Meet two of Beale's Victim Advocates:

Name: Senior Master Sgt. Burrel McCollum Jr.

Hometown: Metter, Ga.

Military experience: 23 years in the Air Force

"There are several reasons why I wanted to become a Victim Advocate. First, I was a security forces member for 14 years and during that time I saw how important victim advocates were in providing help to someone on their worst day. I also wanted to get involved in victim advocacy so victims will know they are not alone and there will be someone to help them through their toughest moments. Since I grew up with only sisters, I learned to be a good listener at an early age, which I think is a critical skill for victim advocates. I think my ability to listen and empathize is the biggest strength I bring to the victim advocacy program because sometimes people don't want you to fix anything; they just want someone to hear and understand them."

Name: Tech. Sgt. Daniel Drennen

Hometown: Montgomery, Ala.

Military experience: 11 years in the Air Force

Tech. Sgt. Daniel Drennen has worked in almost every major functional area in the military including being a mentor and supervisor to young Airmen. He intends to become a first sergeant because he cares about people and can relate to their circumstances in some way. Being and victim advocate is important to Drennen because he cares about his fellow Airmen and can be a flexible good listener.

For more information about SARC programs call Ms. Lucero at 634-4000, option two.