Preparing for Deployment: READI brief

Chaplain (Maj.) Christopher Conklin, 9th Reconnaissance Wing chaplain, gives the Chapel Corps’ portion of the READI brief at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 1, 2017. The READI brief features briefers from 11 different units on base. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Chaplain (Maj.) Christopher Conklin, 9th Reconnaissance Wing chaplain, gives the Chapel Corps’ portion of the READI brief at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 1, 2017. The READI brief features briefers from 11 different units on base. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Master Sgt. Christopher Case, 9th Force Support Squadron readiness noncommissioned officer, concludes a READI brief at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 1, 2017. The brief is designed to prepare personnel and families for issues which may arise during deployments. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

Master Sgt. Christopher Case, 9th Force Support Squadron readiness noncommissioned officer, concludes a READI brief at Beale Air Force Base, California, March 1, 2017. The brief is designed to prepare personnel and families for issues which may arise during deployments. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Tristan D. Viglianco)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

Before an individual deploys from the 9th Reconnaissance Wing they must receive briefings from various agencies and units on base. Originally, these briefs were short and informal, but more recently they have been replaced by the READI brief program.

 

“The READI brief is a two hour briefing, which informs individuals of the services provided to them before, during and after deployments,” said Master Sgt. Christopher Case, 9th Force Support Squadron readiness noncommissioned officer. “It gives them an overview of our programs and what they should expect when going downrange.”

 

A pre-deployment brief is mandatory per AFI, but the previous briefing program often wasn’t attended by families of the deployers. This led to some crucial information not being passed along to them.

 

“We used to provide a briefing down at the flightline, but it was shorter and there wasn’t nearly as many spouses and children who attended,” said Case. “READI helps get the service member and the spouse on the same page before they deploy.”

 

According to Case, the READI brief has evolved since it came to fruition in May 2015.

 

“We are almost at the two-year mark of the new program,” he said. “Since its start, we have extended the briefings and added briefers. For example, Equal Opportunity, Tricare, and the School Liaison Officer are not required briefings, but they are added under this new program to deal with some issues we have seen come up during deployments.”

 

Currently, most of the responsibility of coordinating a briefing falls on the shoulders of Case.

 

“I coordinate with all of the Unit Deployment Managers to determine which deployers need the brief,” he said. “I also set up the room at the club, coordinate with all of the briefers to set up times, give the first part of the briefing and then facilitate the rest of the time.”

 

Case believes the way the 9th RW has implemented the READI brief into their pre-deployment process is distinct.

 

“I have not come across another base which is doing their pre-deployment out-processing this way,” he explained.  “Every base I have seen is doing short 5 to 10 minute briefs. The way we do it is unique to the Air Force.”